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Winter warmers

I remember when I was young, a friend asked me if I’d rather live somewhere that was too  hot, or too cold. I thought about it long and hard, and finally decided “Too cold.” “Why,” she asked me (we lived in Scotland– nobody in their right mind would choose cold over hot). “Because you can always add more clothes, but you can’t take off your skin without extreme pain.”

I kinda had a point; I still feel the same way over 20 years later.

I don’t like being cold. My joints stiffen up, my body starts shivering uncontrollably, and I just don’t really want to move very much. I’d give a small toe in exchange for a fireplace in the winter. And I live in Southern California. Luckily, there are things that can help keep the body warm even if you think your bones are going to freeze and shatter.

Ginger: ginger is fantastic. It warms the stomach, calms digestion, and really gets the digestive fire going. It also stimulates circulation, and helps to keep you warm in the winter. Use it in teas, in food, or make a herbal oil with it, and massage it into frozen limbs in front of the fireplace. If you have one. Chop ginger into your bath water, along with a few cloves. Add powdered ginger to your pumpkin spiced chai. There are many things that you can do with this wonderful medicinal herb to benefit from it during the cold months.

Cayenne: circulatory stimulant galore. Put some cayenne in a tub of water and soak your feet. Your feet will absorb the cayenne, and your body will be warm within minutes. It relieves pain, moves energy and stimulates your body to start heating from the inside. Put cayenne in your food, or in your hot drinks. Make your own tincture, or make a herbal oil to rub into your feet. Keep in mind that a little goes a long way! I accidentally put too much cayenne tincture in a friend’s formula, and I think her tongue just about exploded (lucky it was a friend!).

Cardamom: cardamom is such a wonderful tummy warmer and digestive aid. It is also fantastic at removing dampness from the body. Dampness manifests as bogginess– heavy limbs, cloudy thoughts, low energy, feeling kinda blah. Look at your tongue– is it swollen and greasy looking? Is it cold and wet outside? Add cardamom to your morning coffee– the combined effects of the coffee (which drains damp) and cardamom (which drains damp) really help to move that bogginess.

Clove: a wonderful carminative herb that also helps with dampness and digestion. Throw some in your bath, or a pinch of clove in your tea. Have some spiced wine after dinner.

Cinnamon: is it a coincidence that cinnamon is used in so many winter desserts? I think not! Cinnamon is a fantastic nourisher. It warms the digestive centre, nourishes the fluids in the body, and helps to drain dampness.

Garlic: Garlic is considered to be a hot herb. We have it on hand at all times, just because we love the taste of it so much, but during flu season, and during the winter, it’s even more valuable because it is so lovely and hot! When we are starting to come down with something, we often have a dinner of chicken broth with raw garlic on toast. Of course, nobody will come near you for days, but it’s worth it to be cold-free!

Chicken soup: Though not technically a ‘herb’, chicken soup is one of my favourite warming remedies. One of the reasons that it works so well for colds and flus is that it’s diaphoretic– it heats the body from the centre, which causes you to sweat.

Orange peel: Moves stagnant energy, gently heating, drains damp.

Interested in how to incorporate some of these herbs into foods? Butter, at Hunger and Thirst, has written about a delicious warming broth.

This post is shared at Fight back Friday